25 August 2007

Soundtrack teaser: "Heaven Holds the Faithful Departed."


Martin Scorcese on the set of The Departed

This past year, decades past due, film auteur Martin Scorsese walked off with almost all the hardware at last Oscars for his latest masterwork, The Departed.

With the exception of, as examples, the use of Jim Gordon's half of Layla and Ry Cooder's slide solo from Memo from Turner in the two-movement Goodfellas climax, the use of music, other than the score, in Goodfellas is an embryonic form of what is accomplished in The Departed.

The following is a non-spoiler soundtrack film teaser with notes:

Gimme Shelter
churns -- Ooh, fire is sweeping, our very streets today -- as Mick Jagger and Merry Richards belt their vocals as Keith Richards' lead runs and power chords introduced Jack Nicholson's character Frank Costello.

Mr. French's
character is unsheathed to strains of Duane Allmans' opening slide solo in One Way Out.

Billy tunes-up Providence button men - Nobody But Me by the original Isley Brothers --
... nobody, nobody, nobody..,
.

When Frank Costello first meets Billy, Let It Loose is on the jukebox: Frank's "all dressed up to do you harm."

Patsy Cline's unsurpassable Sweet Dreams cover is on the stereo at Frank's apartment as French and Frank discuss Billy's reliability [blend from Patsy across Irish ditty into John Ono Lennon's Well, Well, Well.

************
Used in love scene between Billy and, radically transformed by Van Morrison's soaring live vocal, into a "sexual healing" song:

Comfortably Numb (-- by Gilmour, Waters; originally from Pink Floyd's The Wall)
[First Verse softly buried under a "find the rat' scene, then the dialogue fades and the song come up.]

Hello?
Is there anybody in there?
Just nod if you can hear me.

Is there anyone at home?

Come on, now,
I hear you're feeling down.
Well I can ease your pain

Get you on your feet again.
...

[transition to Madeline and Billy in her old apartment as she packs]


... There is no pain you are receding
A distant ship, smoke on the horizon.
You are only coming through in waves.
Your lips move but I can't hear what you're saying.

When I was a child
I caught a fleeting glimpse ...

Out of the corner of my eye.
I turned to look but it was gone

I cannot put my finger on it now

The child is grown,
The dream is gone.

... A distant ship, smoke on the horizon.

You are only coming through in waves.

Your lips move but I can't hear what you're saying.


...When I was a child I had a fever

My hands felt just like two balloons.

Now I've got that feeling once again

I can't explain you would not understand

This is not how I am ...


[music fades as teapot boils in kitchen; dialogue and love scene as song fades back in to soundtrack]

... There is no pain you are receding
A distant ship, smoke on the horizon. You are only coming through in waves Your lips move but I can't hear what you're saying.

When I was a child
I caught a fleeting glimpse
Out of the corner of my eye.
I turned to look but it was gone

I cannot put my finger on it now

The child is grown,
The dream is gone. [And] I have become comfortably numb.

*******
I'm Shipping Up To Boston - Dropkick Murphys

And when the deal is going down, truly, this song (in a more hard-edged arrangement than in the YouTube video hyperlink above) rolls and blasts -- traditional Irish music punk band. Who would've thought...it figures[?]

********************
The Departed, as in all aspects of it's construction takes lacing a soundtrack with great tunes to an new level in cinema.
************************************************************************

4 comments:

A radically spiritual progressive libertarian said...

Great stuff. Just had a chance to watch the movie for the first time the other day, and it was clearly Scorsese's best in years.

While I'm not as tuned in the the music as our host as I watch the movie, it was hard not to notice "Gimme Shelter" as Frank Costello is introduced

Paco Malo said...

... and again as Madolyn begins her move into Colin's apartment.

RWA4@aol.com said...

Pac, you know you can always count on me.Marty's long-deserved award (Though I feel his best work was Goodfellas) shows how he is a master at all aspects of film-making. The music is powerful (as was the music in Goodfellas) and helps the tension to build by embracing familiar themes that blow through your head. Rob Zombie's House of 1.000 Corpses and Devil'Rejects also uses familiar song pieces for effect and personally, I think Tarantino is the master of the music, as I usually end up buying a copy of the soundtrack. Tarantino introduces to obscure song from the past we may not had heard of. Marty keeps to the tried and true. Both work.

Paco Malo said...

King Bishop,

Since Jukebox Jim is one of my aliases, I live to build set lists. Best ever: T-Bone Burnett, especially with the Coen Bros. (e.g., "O! Brother Where Art Thou?": saving the world with, not rock 'n' roll, but bluegrass. "2 Cool 2 B Forgotten" (Lucinda W.)

Thanks for your feedback. You da' man. I don't care what the suits upstairs have to say, let them crush somebody else's dream.